BETA

I’LL NEVER FORGET THAT, MA’AM !

They say the men are faithless all,1
And never will prove thrue, dear,2
But of all in all, both great and small,3
I’ll never forget you, dear.4
For ’ tis you that took the hoighth o’ care5
To keep my memory thrue, dear ;6
My memory’s not very good—but I’ll never forget
you, dear.
7
O, Kitty, dear, you need not fear8
That I will e’er forget you,9
I remember all your tindherness10
From the hour that first I met you.11
’Twas at the fair your coaxin’ air12
First made me be your suithor,13
Where I spent my wealth to dhrink your health,14
And toss’d the costly pewther ;15
A lock o’ your hair you promised me—16
With joy my heart was big, ma’am !17
But in the bottom o’ the quart18
I found the fiddler’s wig, ma’am !19
O, indeed, Miss Kit, the dickins a bit20
You’ll wheedle me now with your chat, ma’am :21
My memory’s not very good—22
But I’ll never forget that, ma’am.23
When you bid me step up to the house,24
To spake to your mother and father,25
And said, of all the boys you knew26
’Twas myself that you would rather ;27
A man is standing in front of a fireplace and smoking a pipe. A woman is behind him, bent over, and placing coals into his coat pocket. 1/2 page.
Won’t you take a sate,” says you, “ my dear?”28
With a most seducin’ air, ma’am :29
But, oh ! what a thunderin’ lump of a pin30
You stuck in the sate of the chair, ma’am !31
Indeed, Miss Kit, the dickins a bit32
You’ll wheedle me now with your chat, ma’am,33
My memory’s not very good—34
But I’ll never forget that, ma’am.35
When I said ’ twas you could raise the flame,36
My love, you did but mock it,37
For didn’t you put a coal o’ fire38
Into my new coat pocket ?39
And when I blazed, ’ twas you did shout40
With laughter, to be sure, ma’am,41
O,” says you, “ my dear, I’ll put you out,”42
But, faix, ’ twas out o’ the door, ma’am.43
Indeed, Miss Kit, the dickins a bit44
You’ll wheedle me now with your chat, ma’am.45
My memory’s not very good—46
But I’ll never forget that, ma’am.47
Then didn’t I see black Darby Keogh48
To the little back window pass, ma’am ?49
His ugly face he there did squeeze50
Till he flatten’d his pose on the glass, ma’am.51
Then the sash was riz—I heer’d it squeel—52
There was nothing then between you :53
’Faith, I know how he flatten’d his nose after that !54
Tho’ you thought there was nobody seen you.55
O, indeed, Miss Kit, the dickins a bit56
You’ll wheedle me now with your chat, ma’am :57
My memory’s not very good,—but I’ll never forget
that, ma’am !
58