BETA

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE LESS FAMILIAR LATIN CLASSICS.

No II.

MR NORTH,
The following short pieces are universally attributed to the philosopher
Seneca. They bear marks of his style, and relate, for the most part, to the cir-
cumstances of his misfortunes and banishment. Perhaps they are more curious
than poetical. Far be it from me, however, to say, that “ the moral Spa-
niard” could not have been a poet. Corrupter of the Roman eloquence, as he
is called, his prose works abound with passages of imaginative beauty, and me-
taphors of poetical felicity. That there was a rich vein of poetry in the family,
his nephew Lucan affords an ample proof. His taste in composition is another
thing. It may be as well to remark, in explanation of the present specimens,
that Seneca was born at Corduba in Spain, and was for some time banished to
the island of Corsica.
I am, &c.
T. D.

To Corsica.

I.

Rude Corsica, thou worse than desert land, 1
Held by thy rough Phocæan-race the while ; 2
More narrow than Sardinia’s little strand, 3
Only less wild than Elba’s iron Isle : 4
—Oh ! streamy Corsica, whose flood-worn
stones,
5
Still whiten as thy fiercer summer’s burn, 6
Lie lightly on my banish’d—buried bones, 7
Nor violate the exile’s living urn.8

II.

With these harsh rocks, my harder fates ac-
cord ;
9
Upon the desert earth my head is laid, 10
No sunny fields, no dark’ning groves afford11
My winter sustenance, my summer shade ;12
No spring approaches here with cheering
smile,
13
No golden flow’rs, no herbs these deserts own, 14
No—not the fire for the last funeral pile ; 15
—The outcast and his prison—are alone !16